A PORTFOLIO OF WINES FROM THE MOST SIGNIFICANT WINE PRODUCING AREAS IN THE WORLD

ESTATE PROFILE

An Estate with extraordinary heritage and pedigree. The Hardegg family's winemaking lineage dates back to the 1600's.

The castle and estate belonging to the Hardegg family are located 75 kilometres north of Vienna, along the border with the Czech Republic. The earliest document about the castle dates back to 1188, when the founder of the Hardegg Castle, built it on the banks of the River Thaya. He then took on the name and title of Count Hardegg.

The castle subsequently came under the ownership of the ruling Habsburgs. In 1495, Emperor Maximilian I sold the fortress to Heinrich Prueschenk, a nobleman from Styria, and a direct ancestor of the present Count Maximilian Hardegg. Situated on the northern border of Austria's largest wine region, Weinviertel (the entire region derives its name from viticulture as Weinviertel means the 'wine district'), Graf Hardegg estate wines elegantly bear the mark of their origin. In Weinvietel, warm loess soils and a pannonian climate with mild winters give the wines their typical fruit aroma, while the difference between daytime and night time temperatures intensifies the aroma.

With its endless rolling hills, Weinviertel is Central Europe's oldest agricultural site, as witnessed by archaeological finds dating back some 7,000 years. Wine production at Graf Hardegg Estate dates back to the Middle Ages. The main cellar was built in 1640 and is still in use. All wines from the Estate are produced "naturally", utilising organic techniques. Since vintage 2006, the vineyards have been cultivated biodynamically. Modern cellar technology methods are used only sparingly so that the wine's true character is captured. Only spontaneous fermentation; no added enzymes, and no artificial concentration. The wines are stored and aged in wooden casks. The more contemporary Veltlinsky 'trio' of wines, two of which are 'first ever' releases are intentionally more youthful, approachable and with the exception of the Zweigelt see minimal oak.

Austria
48° 25' 48" N, 16° 6' 0" E